Together In Fitness
Is CrossFit safe for the joints?

Is CrossFit safe for the joints?

Created in 2001, CrossFit, the fitness craze that has swept the nation, brings a new style to the exercise world. CrossFit is comprised of an incredibly wide variety of “functional movements” often combined into a routine. These functional movements can span anywhere from extreme bursts of weightlifting, calisthenics, and heavy movement from running or rowing. The burst-like nature of CrossFit, and the unpredictable nature underlying it, brings about a very important question. Is CrossFit safe for the joints?

Though exercises themselves can be adjusted for safety, principles at the very core of CrossFit work-outs lead to relatively high risks for injury. These injuries are often focused around the joints. This increased risk stems from the base idea of CrossFit that you push forward until your new task is done. Often, CrossFit at its core asks and challenges its participants to push to their limits, surpass them, and keep pushing. This seems great in theory, a workout that motivates you to go above and beyond the concept of what you think you are capable of doing. This theory is significantly challenged by the fact that the body can only do so much so often before it begins to show stress. For CrossFit, in bursts of quick movement with risky goals and a significant focus on an almost improvisational nature, this risk heavily focuses in a dangerous area, the joints.

When the joints receive such a consistent and intense beating, not only could there be temporary and extreme pain, but dangerous long-term issues. In fact, repeated damage to joints from pushing your limits could even lead to the onset of arthritis.  

The Closer View

Too much manganese sparks attention deficit problems
Too much manganese sparks attention deficit problems

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common disorders among children. The symptoms include hyperactivity, impulsiveness, and basically being inattentive while play, at school or at home. While everyone has the tendency of being hyperactive or being inattentive, for…

  • Overcome Your Propensity for Weight Gain Due to Your Genes
  • Lentils - the natural weight-loss food
  • Those Who Lose Weight After 40 Are More At Risk For Dementia

Editor's Pick

What are plyometrics?
What are plyometrics?

Plyometrics is a form of exercise designed mainly to help you perform better in any sport. After practising plyometrics, you are supposed to be able to run faster, jump higher, hit harder and with more accuracy. It is a strengthening exercise that ideally should be a part of the core overall…

Reader's Choice

What you can learn from 11 year-old weightlifter Elle Hatamiya
What you can learn from 11 year-old weightlifter Elle Hatamiya

You have probably already heard about 11-year-old weightlifter Elle Hatamiya. She has recently gone viral with her story of how she has impressed people at the gym. It is easy to tell what a bright future is waiting for this brave and perseverant girl. Before we start mentioning what things we can…

  • Music that makes exercise fun for girls of all ages
    Music that makes exercise fun for girls of all ages
  • What 2 group school sports help girls stay fit?
    What 2 group school sports help girls stay fit?
  • How to make workouts less boring
    How to make workouts less boring
  • Does female weight-lifting mean gaining large muscles?
    Does female weight-lifting mean gaining large muscles?

Recent commented

  • What Can You Learn at www.buzzle.com?
    What Can You Learn at www.buzzle.com?
  • Why Swimming Is a Great Workout
    Why Swimming Is a Great Workout
  • How Can Rhythmic Breathing Help You Perform Exercises
    How Can Rhythmic Breathing Help You Perform Exercises

Photography

  • How to make jogging more effective in getting fit